The next American struggle: Waiting out the coronavirus

There are now a lot of known knowns about the coronavirus: It’s here, it’s spreading, it’s stressing hospitals, it’s crippling the economy, it’s slowed only by distance and isolation — and it’s sure to get much worse before it gets much better.

Why it matters: Similarly, there is a sameness to the patterns and known unknowns. So now we hit the maddening stage of waiting.

  • We wait and watch Wuhan and China to see if life really does return to normal once the virus is contained. The global economy hinges on this light at the end of the tunnel.
  • We wait and watch Italy to see when its daily death rate peaks, plateaus and then plunges. This will give us a sense of how long highly concentrated outbreaks elsewhere might last.
  • We wait to see when New York hits its apex (two to three weeks, experts say) and watch how bad it gets. We also watch New Orleans and Detroit to see if New York is an early indicator or an anomaly.
  • We wait for widespread testing to be a reality so we can find out if the virus has spread far beyond our fears.
  • We wait to see if Dr. Anthony Fauci’s projection of 100,000 to 200,000 potential U.S. deaths is accurate — and, if so, how the media, public and markets might react to multiple days with death tolls beyond the nearly 3,000 lost on 9/11.
  • We wait to see Trump’s next move in his itch to «reopen America» after his extension Sunday of social-distancing guidelines through April 30. Does he continue to listen to his scientists, or eventually side with advisers who fear economic disaster if America stays home too long?
  • We wait and watch as drug companies race for a cure, which industry insiders say won’t happen at scale until 2021. We wait to see the consequences of using experimental medications to slow or salve.

The big picture: This waiting period will expose whether coronavirus was an awful three months we will never forget — or a once-in-a-lifetime disruption and destroyer of life.

 
For some, coronavirus pushes new issues to top of national agenda

The coronavirus pandemic is helping shift policy priorities for some Americans, according to results from an online caucus the Glover Park Group provided to Axios.

Why it matters: Crises can force the nation to acknowledge bipartisan problems that are often neglected due to lack of a political motivation to solve them.

The big picture: Equal numbers of respondents (72%) cited each side of the crisis as a top concern — be it getting sick or losing someone close, or the economic damage inflicted by the lockdown.

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Πηγή: axios.com

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