Who Needs Web3?

The internet is a meteor that crashed into human civilization. We absorbed the initial impact. Now, we need to figure out how to fit all the pieces back together.

 
The internet is a meteor that crashed into human civilization. We absorbed the initial impact. Now, we need to figure out how to fit all the pieces back together.

Our problems have become globalized, but we lack global-scale solutions to coordinate our efforts. These solutions currently fall into two main buckets: The US model of relying on corporations to mediate and manipulate our interactions, behavior, and transactions; and the Chinese model of relying on the government to do the same.

Is there a third way?

Last week, Google announced a new program to delete the location data of users who visit “particularly personal” locations like “abortion clinics.” The program was announced on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling to de-legalize abortions and leave the matter to individual states.

Google is worried that state law-enforcement agencies will ask for information about citizens searching for and visiting abortion providers. And Google is not alone. During the same week, the Electronic Frontier Foundation advised women to practice caution when installing and using period-tracking apps.

Corporations, non-profits, and individual people are right to be concerned. Law-enforcement agencies (and hackers) regularly obtain search, location, and other data private corporations collect. They often do so for a good reason, but the ease with which such information is collected and obtained is stunning.

We barely noticed, but the world has turned on its head: In the past, only a suspected criminal would get their phone tapped, their correspondence logged, and their whereabouts tracked. Today, we are all subject to such surveillance.

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Πηγή: drorpoleg.com

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